Of doors and telephones

Ever since I’ve actively started screening my twitter stream, I’ve come across a lot of great articles on usability and good design principles.

A very interesting and standard pattern these articles seem to follow is that in order to bring out principles of good design, they pick up real world examples of bad design and explain why the design is bad; how it violates certain usability guidelines and how you can apply a design principle to make it a good design.

Another peculiar thing that I noticed is that almost invariably, most of these articles end up using two very common everyday objects as  examples of “bad design” : telephones and doors

I can sort of understand and agree that telephones can get intimidating to users specially when they try to use the advanced features like multi-way conferencing or setting up auto redial on no response.

But I was pretty surprised to find so many doors being cited as examples of bad design. A door is a pretty straightforward simple everyday object with absolutely no advanced behavior. All you can do with it is Open it and Close it by either a pull or a push. Even simpler ones are the sliding doors, which i’ve never even bothered to think about because I don’t have to do anything to get them to open or close. I can walk by and be sure they’ll automatically open and shut and let me in or out. Thankfully, i’ve never had panic attacks being trapped inside closed unlocked doors not being able to figure out which way it opens!

Things are about to change though. those very same doors that i’ve walked through innumerable times are in for a close scrutiny when i pass them next time. Indavertantly, i’m sure i’m going to stop and take a second look at them, review their design and slot them into good design/bad design buckets!

🙂

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